Ten for Tuesday: Joy, Inspiration, and Tough Conversations

Here we go!

1. Robert E. Lee Worshipped Here: A Southern church wrestles with its Confederate history.

That church is St. Paul’s Episcopal in Richmond, where I am preaching all week as part of their mid-day Lenten series, a 120-year old tradition. (Wow!) It’s been lovely to get to know these people, and as it turns out, they are featured in Sojourners Magazine this very month about their efforts to come to terms with their past. Article link is above; below is a short video:

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2. Breathe Easy, Repeat.

The alumni magazine of Rice University had a great story about how Rice professors and students have helped saved the lives of preemies in Malawi through a cheap, sturdy CPAP machine made from a simple aquarium pump. Improv at its life-saving best! Proud of my alma mater.

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3. Artist Replaces Billboards with Photos of the Landscapes They’re Blocking

visible-distance-second-sight-my-jennifer-bolande-for-desertx-1When life hands you lemons, err billboards…

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4. These are the top 37 things you’ll regret when you’re old

Number 1 is travel. Some expected ones and some surprising ones.

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5. A Mendelssohn masterpiece was really his sister’s. After 188 years, it premiered under her name.

“Easter Sonata” — a complex four-movement piano composition from 19th century Germany — could only have been written by Felix Mendelssohn.

Or so thought many of the archivists, scholars and musicians who encountered it. The sonata was “masculine,” “violent” and “ambitious,” all the hallmarks of the celebrated Romantic era composer.

Written in 1829, the manuscript of “Easter Sonata” was considered “lost” for more than 140 years, until the original turned up in a French book shop bearing the signature “F Mendelssohn.” The collector who bought it concluded the “F” stood for Felix.

It took yet another four decades and a lot of clever musicological sleuthing, but in 2010 a Duke University graduate student revealed what some had suspected all along: “Easter Sonata” was not written by Felix Mendelssohn, but by his sister, Fanny Mendelssohn, herself a musical prodigy.

Fantastic! Now let’s work on identifying all those “Anonymous” works…

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6. Walls and Wells: A Prayer of Confession

Last week’s NEXT Church National Gathering was as wonderful as it is every year. Many of us were captivated by one of the closing readings, a prayer that turned out to be written by a friend, Shelli Latham. So potent for these days:

Creator of All,
of the mountains that cut jagged and purple against an infinite sky,
of the forests that pulse like a heartbeat with an immeasurable collection
of wiggles and squiggles and colors and calls.
Creator of us – Imago Dei . . . made in the image of God.
And so we busy ourselves with creating too . . .
constructing, building, branding, barricading,
policing the sacred with a limited imagination for you unlimited grace.
And so we pray,
that you might overturn our misguided architecture.
For every barrier that should be a bridge,
for every wall that should be a table,
we pray, O God,
when we build them up,
won’t you knock them down?

Click the link above for the whole thing. Turns out confession really is good for the soul.

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7. Five Self-Care Strategies That Aren’t F***ing Mani-Pedis

There’s nothing wrong with a good mani-pedi, but I loved this article and have been working on putting many of these strategies in place for myself. Wise, with some PG-13 language.

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8. Miniature Displays of Contemporary Urban Buildings by Joshua Smith

Courtesy of Colossal. These are fantastic!

Joshua_05

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Uh-oh, that’s only eight links!

I think I’ll let that be enough, inspired by numbers 15 and 23 of the regret article above. Haha.

Have a day filled with beauty and ordinary and extraordinary courage.

 

 

2 thoughts on “Ten for Tuesday: Joy, Inspiration, and Tough Conversations

  1. anne

    when i got to st. paul’s yesterday, i found their ‘walking tour’ brochure and looked at their windows while reading about them in the brochure. i had never had a similar experience of seeing civil war windows like the ones at st. paul’s. thanks for sending this link to offer some context of what the church is doing w/ regard to the civil war artifacts.

    Reply
  2. Sarah Erickson

    Eight is way more than enough this week! Loved the two lists in particular. Sharing with others, too.

    Reply

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