Tag Archives: my book

Resting in the Words of Others

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Lent begins tomorrow, and among other things, I’m experiencing the season by taking a break from blogging. But only sort of. These next several weeks I’ll be highlighting posts from the archives, sharing quotes and links that mean something to me, and maybe even posting a photo or two.

There are a number of reasons for this, one being that I’m trying to make headway on my next book, Spirituality in the Smartphone Age. I need to create some space and time for those words to come. So I’ll be resting in the words of others…

In this space, anyway. I’ll be writing short weekly reflections on my email list, which you can sign up for here.

I’ve written before about how judgy people can get about Lent practices that strike them as too much about self-improvement and not enough about devotion to God. I’m not interested in diagnosing whether giving up blog writing is a “good enough” discipline. It’s what I’m doing, that’s all. I feel called to it.

How about you? Will you be taking on a practice this Lent?

~

photo credit: Darwin Bell via photopin cc

“But Can I Watch Football on the Sabbath?” With a Nod to Brene Brown’s Daring Greatly

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Sabbathing or numbing out?

When I speak to groups about Sabbath, I almost always start at the same place:

Turn to the person next to you and tell them one thing that brings you delight. It can’t be work-related (though I hope you are delighted by your work!), and ideally, it isn’t something that requires costly equipment or an exotic locale. This is something you can potentially do without much effort or expense.

After folks have shared with their neighbors, I suggest that their delightful activity might be a place where they’re already practicing Sabbath without calling it that.. and/or it’s an entry point to think about incorporating Sabbath into their lives. Sabbath, as Isaiah reminds us in the Old Testament, is to be kept as a delight, not a chore. The creation story in Genesis has this relentless refrain: it’s good, it’s good, it’s good. This world is good. Our bodies are good, and made for pleasure. In my own tradition, the Westminster Statement of Faith says our primary purpose is to glorify and enjoy God.

That doesn’t mean that every enjoyable activity brings us closer to the Holy, I suppose. And sometimes in my retreats and discussions, people look at me skeptically when I talk about the delight stuff. Shouldn’t we be doing “holy” things on that day? Isn’t Sabbath about prayer and Bible reading and all those religious practices? Can we really do whatever we want?

What about watching football on TV?

I’m never quite sure how to answer. For one thing, I’m not the Sabbath police.

For another thing, while I do find prayer and Bible study to be meaningful and important activities for Christians, and lovely things to do on Sabbath, I’m more of a Barbara Brown Taylor Christian, which means I do not see a big division between sacred and secular activities.

But does that mean anything can be a Sabbath activity?

I’m reading Brené Brown’s latest book, Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent and Lead, and she’s helped me finally get more concrete with my answer to the football question.

[If you're not familiar with her work, the best introduction is her crazy-viral TED talk. By the way, she wants to be my big sister, doesn't she? Of course she does. She can do this, because there aren't thousands of other recovering perfectionists AND aspiring writers also clamoring to be her kid sister. No siree. Cough.]

Anyway, Brené Brown helps me answer the “football on Sabbath” question when she talks about numbing. She writes:

I believe we all numb our feelings. We may not do it compulsively or chronically, which is addiction, but that doesn’t mean that we don’t numb our sense of vulnerability. And numbing vulnerability is especially debilitating because it doesn’t just deaden the pain of our difficult experiences; numbing vulnerability also dulls our experiences of love, joy, belonging, creativity, and empathy. We can’t selectively numb emotion.

There aren’t any checklists or norms to help you identify shadow comforts or other destructive numbing behavior. This requires self-examination and reflection… Are my choices comforting and nourishing my spirit, or are they temporary reprieves from vulnerability and difficult emotions that ultimately diminish my spirit?

For me, sitting down to a wonderful meal is nourishment and pleasure. Eating while I’m standing, be it in front of the refrigerator or inside the pantry, is always a red flag.Sitting down to watch one of my favorite shows on television is pleasure. Flipping through channels for an hour is numbing.

This is the key to Sabbath as well. Really, it comes down to intention. I can imagine times when watching football feels immersive and enlivening. Can such an activity also feed us spiritually? Don’t know; I don’t have the spectator sports gene myself. But I can see how getting caught up in a thrilling contest, in which athletes are performing to the best of their abilities and using their “fearfully and wonderfully made” bodies to their utmost, would be grounding and inspiring… and maybe even bring us closer to God. But I can imagine other times in which watching sports on TV feels mindless, when we watch out of habit or boredom, when we’re not really there.

I think that’s why some people see Facebook as such a source of unhappiness. In my opinion, there’s nothing inherently numbing about social media. Used in an intentional and mindful way, it’s a great source of fun and connection.

What makes Facebook a challenge is that, unlike a football game, there’s no end to it. We can start out enjoying the relationships we cultivate there, but when we spend too much time scrolling through people, we start to numb out. I’m a big fan of technology, and as FB friends know, I’m a chatty FBer. I’ve also thought a lot about how to use it in a way that’s good for me. So I’ve put all kinds of boundaries around it, whether it’s using lists or only signing on a couple of times a day (and not at all on most weekends).

What do you think about this numbing stuff? Have you read Daring Greatly?

~

I haven’t said this recently: thank you to everyone who has read Sabbath in the Suburbs and recommended it to friends. If you haven’t already, I’d be most thankful for an Amazon review.

photo credit: laverrue via photopin cc

It’s a Birthday… and That Means Gifts!

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Sabbath in the Suburbs was released exactly one year ago!

Tooooooooooot!

Yeah… that was a party horn.

What a fun, harrowing, joyful, tense, and fascinating experience it is to write and publish a book. I’m so thankful for the folks at Chalice Press and The Young Clergy Women Project for believing in the book and supporting it.

I’m especially grateful for the cast of thousands—that’s you guys—who have supported me by reading the book… and for those who have reviewed it on Amazon (one of you as recently as this weekend), told friends about it, and shared it with book groups and Sunday School classes.

Speaking of groups…

In honor of this milestone, I’m giving away a Sabbath Book Group Study Pack to two lucky winners. This includes five signed copies of the book, a printed copy of the Sabbath Supplementals discussion materials, and hi-def versions of the five Sabbath videos on flash drive. I’ll also throw in a couple of fun extras to help your group have a great time together.

(But wait, some of you may say. I’m not connected to a church or group! That’s cool. In fact, many of the book’s fans are non-religious or otherwise unaffiliated. If you win, I’ll send you the five books for you to give to friends or distribute as you wish. And you’ll still get the fun mystery extras.)

To enter the drawing, you can either:

1. Tweet about Sabbath in the Suburbs and/or the Sabbath Supplementals; please include my Twitter handle (@revmamd) so I can keep track of your entry.

2. Share about the book and/or the Supplementals on Facebook. Again, be sure to tag me so I know you’ve done this and your entry will count.

3. Email or otherwise contact a friend whom you think would be interested in the book. Comment here to let me know you’ve done that (yes, you’re on the honor system for this one).

Each time you do one of the following, you will be entered, so feel free to mix it up. But don’t go overboard. People don’t like that.

Contest closes on Wednesday at 10 p.m. Eastern. (I’m sorry that I can only ship to the United States and Canada.)

And now… who’s up for some virtual cake?

~

photo credit: rottnapples via photopin cc

They’re Here! They’re Here!

The Sabbath Supplementals are here!

We’ve got a discussion guide, suggestions for group activities and retreats, and other goodies for book clubs, Sunday School classes, and other folks making their way through Sabbath in the Suburbs. Huzzah!

Download the Sabbath Supplementals PDF from Dropbox here.

We’re especially excited about the videos, designed to complement the themes in the book. The written materials include suggested ways to use them, or just show them to your group and have at it. Each video is below, and here’s the whole album.

A big thanks to Lukrative Visual Products for the vision, creativity, and hard work to make these videos a reality.

 

 

 

 

 

Order Sabbath in the Suburbs from Chalice PressAmazon, or the online bookseller of your choice. Or yours truly.

 

Planning for Fall Programming? I Ship Books!

My book and a cuddly kitty... what could be more Sabbathy than that?

My book and a cuddly kitty… what could be more Sabbathy than that?

Yesterday I did some corresponding with a church that wants to order 25 copies of Sabbath in the Suburbs for a group study this fall. Conversations like those make me very happy indeed!

Friends sometimes ask, “Where should I order your book in order to be most advantageous to you as the author?” That’s a very kind thing to care about. Ultimately, whatever method gets the book into your hands is the method I want you to use.

That said, there are a number of options:

Chalice, my publisher, has the cheapest price online, at $15.99. I make more per book that at other online retailers. But shipping is additional, so you need to factor in that cost when you order.

Many people like Amazon for the Prime shipping, although they just raised the price of my book this week to $17.99. (I can’t make heads or tails of what they do.) I make somewhat less per book through Amazon than through Chalice, but ordering through Amazon increases the book’s rank, which (I think?) raises its visibility on topical searches and such. It’s also possible that for a book as ‘small’ and specialized as mine, rank doesn’t matter.

I also ship directly for orders of 10 or more. I’ll sign them and include an invoice, or you can pay me through PayPal. I can usually do this for about $15 a copy. Email me at [email protected] if you want to pursue this.

As I said, it’s kind for people to ask where they should order the book in order to yield me the maximum profit. But book writing is not a big money-making enterprise for most of us. And that’s OK. My aspiration is to write and to be read. If you visit this blog regularly, then I’ve met my goal. If you buy the book and read it, that’s icing on the cupcake.