Tag Archives: music

An Advent Playlist: What Would You Add?

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Got to talking on Facebook the other day about Advent albums—in theory, this should be its own thing, as a season separate from Christmas, but it’s often folded into the behemoth category of Christmas music.

I only knew of one album of Advent music, but of course, many friends schooled me on the other great ones out there. So I’ve been building a bit of a playlist, which people have asked for.

Here you go—sorry there are no links, but I’m doing this quickly since we’re celebrating a certain seven year old’s birthday today. A quick Google or iTunes search will get you there.

ALBUMS

Advent: Piano Solos, Jim Morgan. Especially these tracks: Rejoice, Divinum Mysterium, Hyfrydance (my favorite)

Advent at Ephesus, Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles. I dumped the whole album onto the playlist because it’s such lovely choral music.

Midwinter, Peter Mayer. This singer-songwriter hits just the right Adventish tone on this album of original music, though a few tracks are explicitly Christmasy. So you should avoid Stables, Christmas Morning, Heavenly Child, and Make My Christmas Day until later. But don’t forget to add them to your Christmas playlist because they’re beautiful. I dream of using Where Is the Light with a church choir someday. It’s rousing!

Advent, Vol. 1 and Advent, Vol. 2, The Brilliance. These were recommendations, haven’t downloaded them yet. Same with Advent by Tangled Blue.

SONGS

Thanksgiving, George Winston, December.

Each Winter As the Year Grows Colder, Marty Haugen. Haven’t found a version of this that I love, but the words are wonderful, very Adventish.

God, Beyond All Names, Bernadette Farrell. I like the Trinity Episcopal Church version. I could listen to these lyrics all day. And it has a fun alto line.

Veni Emmanuel and Of the Father’s Love Begotten, both from Winter’s Solstice III by Wyndham Hill

Beneath the Trees, William Ackerman, Winter Solstice

There is No Rose, Chanticleer, A Chanticleer Christmas

Lo How a Rose E’er-Blooming, Jennifer Knapp and Margaret Becker, The Hymns of Christmas

O Come O Come Emmanuel, Pentatonix, PTXmas

Gabriel’s Message, Sting. He has a couple versions of this (most recently on his Winter’s Night album) but I like the original 1980s version from A Very Special Christmas.

Enjoy! What have I missed?

~

photo credit: chrisotruro via photopin cc

3 Ways the Internet Made My Life Awesome This Week

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It’s a heavy time in the world.
Ebola.
Israel and Palestine… please let the cease fire hold.
Ukraine—still unstable, and I have a personal stake in this.
There are no Christians left in Mosul, Iraq for the first time in almost 2,000 years.
The children keep coming from central America, fleeing a level of violence and lawlessness (or even just poverty) we can scarcely imagine.
And those little Nigerian girls are still missing.

The globalization of the news means it all appears right in my blue room. I wouldn’t have it any other way. As David Wilcox sings, “there’s no ‘far away.'”

So like many of you, I do what I can, and I take my signs of hope and joy where I can get them. It is a privileged thing to be able to do that, to turn one’s attention elsewhere for a while. But I must. We must. Otherwise it’s too overwhelming.

So in that spirit, here are three things that brought some awesomeness to my life this week—Internet edition:

  1. Serving communion to one of our members who’s in a nursing home. She wanted the five of us gathered to sing “On Eagle’s Wings”. We didn’t know the words, but no problem: Safari on the iPhone to the rescue. Best communion I’ve attended in a long time.
  2. The discovery of Moms RUN This Town, a running club whose local chapter has a Facebook page. After 3 years of running solo and only occasionally with friends because of my crazy schedule, I now have access to groups of people in the neighborhood running early and late and fast and slow and everything in between.
  3. This guy. Just this guy. You’re going to want to fast forward, but don’t. Just let it emerge.

What is making your life awesome right now?

photo credit: Nina Matthews Photography via photopin cc. I chose it simply for its beauty.

Selfies, Social Media and Sarah McLachlan

My sweet mother and I at Wolf Trap last Saturday night.

My sweet mother and I at Wolf Trap last Saturday night.

My mom and I went to see Sarah McLachlan at Wolf Trap on Saturday night. It was a great night to be on the lawn, and a lovely show. (By the way, just how much Wolf Trap picnic food is provided by Trader Joe’s? A LOT.)

I’ve got technology on the brain these days as I work on my book, so I was interested in how people were experiencing the concert with and through their smartphones.  It’s been a couple of years since I’ve been to Wolf Trap, but I’ve seen the norms change dramatically even during that time. Whipping out one’s phone to send a text or check Facebook used to be rare and (I sensed) frowned upon. By now it’s the norm, at least on the lawn.

One of the great things about live music is the way it knits together audience and performer as a community, albeit for a limited time and in a particular place. Does the use of social media expand that community, or does it dilute the overall experience? Or are both possible? (I think you know I’m a Both kinda gal.)

Before I go further, let me say this: the vast majority of cell phone usage I saw was from people who were way older than I am. So those of you clearing your throats for your “kids today” lecture, save it. This is a seriously intergenerational phenomenon now.

Here are some ways I witnessed people using their phones during the concert… or did so myself.

  • Looking up Sarah’s Wikipedia page to see how old she is, because she looks amazing. (She’s 46)
  • Taking notes on her setlist, presumably to download tunes later, or create a playlist.
  • Googling the Sarah McLachlan School of Music, a free program for underserved kids in the Vancouver area that provides high-quality music programs and lessons at no charge, which Sarah mentioned during the show.
  • Random checking of social media during the slow moments.
  • Texting friends to say, “I’m here watching Sarah McLachlan and remembering so happily our Lilith Fair days.” (That was me. Shoutout to K and G)
  • Receiving a photo of one’s children proudly displaying the awards they received at the swim team picnic that evening. (Also me.)
  • Lifting up glowing screens during the slow songs, with or without the benefit of the Candle app.
  • Recording snippets of songs to share with friends.

My guess is that some of those activities seem legit to you, and others make you bristle. Which ones and why?

It should be said, I could’ve done without the gals in front of me taking repeated selfies after it got dark… with the flash.

I also could’ve done without the people next to me talking loudly during much of the first act. Oh yeah, that has nothing to do with smartphone use. But wait! I thought technology was the downfall of polite civilization! You mean people can be boorish and rude without benefit of their cell phones? Get outta here! ;-)

New Running Playlist: Holly Jolly Edition

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UPDATE for 2014: I’ve created a Spotify playlist, though not all of the songs were available.

You knew this was coming… after all, I have strong opinions about holiday music.

Very. Strong. Opinions.

On one hand, a running playlist consisting of holiday tunes is a daunting assignment. Christmas music is much more “hot toddy” than “hill repeats.”

On the other hand… I own a LOT of Christmas music.

So here it is: the Christmas playlist, and at more than 25 songs, it’s a long one. It may not get you pumping your fists like Rocky or strutting like Queen Bey or two-stepping to Texas, but it’ll put a jingle in your step and a smile on your sweaty Grinch face.

Full list is below, including album info as needed.

And here it is in iTunes widget form, minus some of the Chieftains medley and the U2 song (sorry, that appears to be on some kind of import that I picked up somehow)

“Jingle Bells,” Diana Krall

“Christmas is Coming,” Vince Guaraldi Trio (Charlie Brown Christmas)

“Merry Christmas, Baby,” Bruce Springsteen

“Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” Mary J. Blige (A Mary Christmas)

“I’ve Got My Love to Keep Me Warm,” Frank Sinatra

“Trepak,” Modern Mandolin Quartet (from Winter’s Solstice III)

“Silver Bells,” Tony Bennett

“Sleigh Ride,” Andy Williams

“Santa Claus is Coming to Town,” Manhattan Transfer

“Go Tell It on the Mountain,” Wynton Marsalis

“Little Saint Nick,” Muppets (John Denver and the Muppets: A Christmas Together)

“The Holly and the Ivy,” George Winston (December)

“Santa Bring My Baby Back to Me,” Elvis Presley

“My Favorite Things,” Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass (Making Merry)

“Amen,” Take 6 (He Is Christmas)

“Medley, ‘The Wren, The Wren!'” The Chieftains (Bells of Dublin)

“Greensleeves,” Joshua Bell with Chick Corea (Musical Gifts)

“Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree,” Amy Grant

“Soul Cake,” Sting (If on a Winter’s Night)

“Jingle Bells,” Ella Fitzgerald (Ella Wishes You a Swingin’ Christmas)

“Sleigh Ride,” She & Him

“The Most Wonderful Time of the Year,” Harry Connick Jr. (What a Night!)

“Maybe This Christmas,” Tracey Thorn (Tinsel and Lights)

“Deck the Halls,” Butch Thompson, Yulestride

“Good King Wenceslas,” Mel Torme

“I Believe in Father Christmas,” U2 (All You Need is Love EP)

“Holly Jolly Christmas,” Michael Buble

“Hallelujah Chorus,” pretty much anyone

~

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photo credit: Ben Lawson via photopin cc

A Sermon in 272 Words

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We don’t have an actual photograph of Abraham Lincoln giving the Gettysburg Address because the speech was over before the photographer had time to take one.

I’ve been talking about it on Facebook and Twitter for weeks, and here it is, today’s “Gettysburg sermon.” At 272 words, it is the same length as Lincoln’s masterful address, delivered 150 years ago on Tuesday.

Err… let’s just say he had a gift.

(Preacher nerds: you’ll notice I couldn’t resist trying a Lowry loop, even with so few words! Old habits die hard.)

MaryAnn McKibben Dana
Idylwood Presbyterian Church
November 17, 2013

Psalm 98

O sing to the LORD a new song, for he has done marvelous things. His right hand and his holy arm have gotten him victory. The LORD has made known his victory; he has revealed his vindication in the sight of the nations. He has remembered his steadfast love and faithfulness to the house of Israel. All the ends of the earth have seen the victory of our God. Make a joyful noise to the LORD, all the earth; break forth into joyous song and sing praises. Sing praises to the LORD with the lyre, with the lyre and the sound of melody. With trumpets and the sound of the horn make a joyful noise before the King, the LORD. Let the sea roar, and all that fills it; the world and those who live in it. Let the floods clap their hands; let the hills sing together for joy at the presence of the LORD, for he is coming to judge the earth. He will judge the world with righteousness, and the peoples with equity.

~

Here is a psalm for the month of thanksgiving! It is infused with gratitude as the psalmist rhapsodizes about God’s glory, the wonders of creation, and the thankful songs of the people of God. We are sailing along on a swelling sea of words like joy, steadfast love, faithfulness.

And then, like a thud, or like a needle scratching across the record, we’re told:

God is coming to judge us. To judge.

What comes to mind when you hear that word?

Maybe you’re rubbing your hands together imagining “bad guys” getting what they deserve, and “good guys” getting their reward, courtesy of God’s perfect justice.

Maybe you’re making a mental tally of your secret transgressions, squirming, wondering what side of the ledger sheet you will come out on.

Maybe you’re disturbed by the idea of a judging God.

Note that, in the midst of God coming as judge, the psalmist doesn’t tell us to shape up…
or beg us to repent.
He doesn’t even urge us to get to work doing what God commands.

Instead, he asks us to sing.

God will come—God does come—among us. But we don’t worry or calculate. We don’t try to measure up or crack God’s code. We simply inhale deeply, breathing in God’s spirit, and sing—with our voices, with our lives, and here with this community.

Yesterday’s health fair, and last week’s CROP hunger walk, are more than mission activities. They are songs of praise, joyfully offered to a God who promises to be with us always, who calls us not to despair, but to offer a new song.

Thanks be to God.

~

UPDATE: Here are three additional Gettysburg sermons, from Jason Cashing, Rob Jackson, and Jen Hackbarth. Thanks for sharing, everyone!