Friday Link Love: No More Random Than Usual Edition

This post was originally “perhaps more random than usual” but I thought better of one of my links. *I* found it amusing, but it was off-color and had the potential to offend, so away it went.

Onward:

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Rest: Breathing Space and Sabbath Work — Mihee Kim-Kort

Mihee is a fellow pastor and Chalice Press author. She was with the board of the Young Clergy Women last week and talked about how it was a Sabbath experience, even though she was working:

…a mixed-up experience of Sabbath from daily living, i.e. from the babies. It was a Sabbath-work. It was space to breathe, without being stifled and smothered by my extremely loving babies. It was a space to be, and be not only a mom but a pastor, a sister, a leader, a thinker, a writer. It was a space to receive, and give in a different way.

A space she found restful and Sabbath-y.

I love this. One of the things I do in the book is explore different ways of thinking about Sabbath other than simply “not working.” For example, one section talks about Sabbath as a time to cultivate novelty. By moving into a different creative space, we are able to find rest and renewal.

She’s also got a great link to a TED talk called “The Art of Possibility.” How can you not lean in to that?

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Lamp Made from Sawmill Waste and LEDs — Colossal

A perfect illustration of that old preaching saw about how the cracks are important because that’s where the light shines through:

Genius.

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The Greatest Films of All Time — Roger Ebert

And he would know, eh? The reasoning behind his choices is enjoyable to read, as is everything Ebert writes:

The two [new] candidates, for me, are Charlie Kaufman’s “Synecdoche, New York” (2008) and Terrene Malick’s “The Tree of Life” (2011). Like the Herzog, the Kubrick and the Coppola, they are films of almost foolhardy ambition. Like many of the films on my list, they were directed by the artist who wrote them. Like several of them, it attempts no less than to tell the story of an entire life.

In “Synecdoche,” Kaufman does this with one of the most audacious sets ever constructed: An ever-expanding series of boxes or compartments within which the protagonist attempts to deal with the categories of his life. The film has the insight that we all deal with life in separate segments, defined by choice or compulsion, desire or fear, past or present. It is no less than a film about life.

In “The Tree of Life,” Malick boldly begins with the Big Bang and ends in an unspecified state of attenuated consciousness after death. The central section is the story of birth and raising a family.

I could choose either film. I will choose “The Tree of Life” because it is more affirmative and hopeful. I realize that isn’t a defensible reasons for choosing one film over the other, but it is my reason, and making this list is essentially impossible, anyway.

Have you seen Tree of Life? We’ve had it sitting on our coffee table from Netflix for oh, two months or so. I will watch it!

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Panoramic Picture from Mars — NASA

Click on the link above for a 360-degree view of the Red Planet. Stunning, although I do love our pretty blue one.

(Note that this is NOT from Curiosity. In fact this may not even be a new picture. But it was new to me—maybe it’s new for you too.)

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Why Great Ideas Get Rejected — 99U

Creativity requires an element of novelty, but novelty provokes uncertainty:

We now know that regardless of how open-minded people are, or claim to be, they experience a subtle bias against creative ideas when faced with uncertain situations. This isn’t merely a preference for the familiar or a desire to maintain the status quo. Most of us sincerely claim that we want the positive changes creativity provides. What the bias affects is our ability to recognize the creative ideas that we claim we desire. Thus, when you’re pitching your creative idea, it may not be the idea itself that is being rejected. The more likely culprit could be the uncertainty your audience is feeling, which in turn is overriding their ability to recognize the idea as truly novel and useful.

If the implicit bias against creativity is triggered by uncertainty, then crafting your pitch to maximize certainty should improve the odds of the idea being accepted. You can do this in a variety of ways…

Members of the NEXT Church and other change agents: be advised.

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Pride Parade in Uganda — Advocate

This came across my Facebook feed last night. I don’t care who you are or what you believe, that is some stunning bravery right there.

Gorgeous.

Go in peace. Live fearless.

3 thoughts on “Friday Link Love: No More Random Than Usual Edition

  1. Katherine Willis Pershey

    Oh, man. Synecdoche NY is perhaps my least favorite movie ever. It basically gave me a depression attack… Which is probably just proof that it really is an excellent, affecting movie. Just not my kind of movie.

    Reply
  2. Rachel Heslin

    I had thought of you when I read the 99% article on creativity vs uncertainty, because it seemed to so clearly mesh with your previous link about the Mean World Syndrome: if we want to move forward as human beings, we need to foster an environment of love and safety in order to feel secure enough to test our wings.

    Reply
  3. mkk

    Ha, just saw this – thanks for the link love! I’ve been mia/low-key in the blog-world. But being fed by you, as always.

    Reply

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